Forums > Stand Up Paddle Foiling

Latest in Prone Board design?

Reply
Created by eppo > 9 months ago, 1 Jun 2021
Main
QLD, 2312 posts
5 Aug 2021 4:51AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Piros said..
Those are stress cracks but are you a sinker start or wakeboard style start. It's not from the straps. You have a 2.7kg high performance board. Ski bumps and arse dragging starts is not what it's designed for. The cleanest way to start tow foiling is sink the board as the rope comes around and you just pop up with minimal pressure. Starting side on like a wake board loads the board so bad . Learn to sink it , it's way faster , safer & much less pressure on the board.

Sorry to post such a long video but just watch the sinking start in the first 5 secs of the video , he is riding a JS 4-2 and it's still in mint condition. No stress marks at all.


Wake start. Didn't even think of that! Always assumed it was the way the board was attached with occy straps to the sled on the way out and back..

Another1
WA, 12 posts
14 Aug 2021 4:01AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
frenchfoiler said..

Piros said..
My latest prone board 4-2 x 19-3/4 x 32 litres . Carrying a bit of winter fat at 90 kg but still will float me fine . Full carbon 3.1kg with grip.

www.instagram.com/p/CSF0knCBXq9/?utm_medium=copy_link







Nice board.

One thing I have noticed is the box positionning is very different from one brand to another and i guess it has a lot to do with the foil you use.
With my Unifoil 170 I need the box more forward even on a 4'3.


Agree with the box position for the Unifoil, I'm on the 210 hyper with the 4'6" 140 wave chaser and have it all the way forward and feel like I could still use a little bit more as the boxes seem to be set further back then boards like the JS and Amos.

saltwaterwine
NSW, 10 posts
14 Aug 2021 8:25AM
Thumbs Up

Ive found the volume is critical for tow starts. For me at 75kg, 34lt is too much to submerge. However for prone surf paddle 34lt is perfect at 4'9", it duck dives properly and also paddles better than my 5'7" short surf board. Weve just made some sub 20lt x 950mm long very short boards for tow to avoid sideway starts. Downwind prone is another requirement, that board is 6'3" x 21.5 70 lt. And the wing board is 5'7" x 27.5 at 85lt.
Lockdown has had some plusses, Were ready for summer at least.

Main
QLD, 2312 posts
27 Sep 2021 3:39PM
Thumbs Up

Just arrived from Hawaii ! Amundson Super Model. Super light and very narrow.













kobo
NSW, 857 posts
27 Sep 2021 5:20PM
Thumbs Up

Nice, how much ?what type of construction and weight ?

Main
QLD, 2312 posts
27 Sep 2021 6:03PM
Thumbs Up

It's full carbon vacuum bagged. haven't got any scales to weigh it here - will let you know. It's lighter than my JS though..

bjhjames
QLD, 147 posts
27 Sep 2021 7:36PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Main said..
It's full carbon vacuum bagged. haven't got any scales to weigh it here - will let you know. It's lighter than my JS though..


Very cute, looks great on the 120 ... both so skinny.

Boardingwave
25 posts
26 Jan 2022 7:22PM
Thumbs Up

Learning the proper way to push and pump to speed up my board is important. But the condition of my equipment will also help in increasing my speed.

windwakerider
WA, 33 posts
27 Jan 2022 1:48AM
Thumbs Up

Looks like a carbon innegra weave

SammyJ
WA, 568 posts
17 Mar 2022 8:58PM
Thumbs Up

Any heavier guys on here, I'm talking 95-105kgs able to share their experience with different board volumes.

Wanting to transition from SUP to prone but not a great deal of info around as a guide, I like the 5'2 JS Black eagle or 5'0 Sunova pilot both are 42L. I've tried a 4'10 & 4'11 at 39L and 40L both float me ok when sitting but seem to short at my height of 6'1 waves weren't great so hard to really judge performance there certainly felt like I would prefer some more volume under the chest for paddle power, but is 2L more much or would I be better going more like 45/46L. Heard different opinions.... like ride 5L more than your prone surfboard volume and don't go longer than 5'0 just go thicker etc.

Alternative options are to obviously wait and get a custom from the many oz shapers or get the next size up of 1 of the two above boards mentioned.
Cheers

colin71
NSW, 58 posts
22 Mar 2022 6:13PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
SammyJ said..
Any heavier guys on here, I'm talking 95-105kgs able to share their experience with different board volumes.

Wanting to transition from SUP to prone but not a great deal of info around as a guide, I like the 5'2 JS Black eagle or 5'0 Sunova pilot both are 42L. I've tried a 4'10 & 4'11 at 39L and 40L both float me ok when sitting but seem to short at my height of 6'1 waves weren't great so hard to really judge performance there certainly felt like I would prefer some more volume under the chest for paddle power, but is 2L more much or would I be better going more like 45/46L. Heard different opinions.... like ride 5L more than your prone surfboard volume and don't go longer than 5'0 just go thicker etc.

Alternative options are to obviously wait and get a custom from the many oz shapers or get the next size up of 1 of the two above boards mentioned.
Cheers


I'm 6'3 / 95kgs and am now on a 4'7 which is 41L. Last board was 5'0 and 39L. Definitely liking the shorter board better once on foil. The extra two litres seems to mostly offset the reduced waterline when paddling.

A few guys at my local say they are pretty close to their shortboard volume (but they tend to be the very advanced guys).

juandesooka
579 posts
23 Mar 2022 7:26AM
Thumbs Up

Two cents from a middle ager ... I transitioned out of shortboarding due to insufficient fitness, just not strong enough paddling to compete in the crowds. Longboard, sup, kitesurf, supfoil, and now full circle to riding sub 5 foot boards prone foiling in my 50s. I suspect I could now get away with riding a shortboard again in decent waves, as I am probably in better paddling condition than in my late 30s. Which is kinda sad looking back on it.

I started prone foiling bigger higher volume boards (converted surfboards) and steadily chipped away, but once I got down to somewhere low 30s, I found the paddling too much of a slog. I could catch waves for a short time, but would use up all my energy plowing water paddling back. I have lately been using short n fat style, 4.6 board but 4" thick, so probably 40ish litres. Its works for me, no problems paddling or catching waves. People talk about feeling too disconnected from foil on thick boards, and that may be, I plan to experiment again with thinner to see if it's a noticable difference. Another option is to cut in some deep concave on deck, same deep waterline but slightly closer to foil.

Another buddy, same age as me, similar surfing ability, has passed me in foiling capability...he's achieved pump monkey status, while I am struggling with that. His main board is an older blue planet 5.5ish probably 50L and he RIPS on it, getting multiples and big carves. I bring this up because if you believe what you read online, he should not be able to do what he's doing -- but there he is doing it. So I think take some of the board performance obsession with the old grain of salt....it reminds me of endless debates back in the 90s about adding 1/32" extra width on our nearly identical potato chip thrusters that we could barely paddle. :-)

Mjd123xyz
1 posts
29 May 2022 5:08AM
Thumbs Up

I recently purchased a 4'5" 38L prone board from PPC with the intention to wing and Dock start it.

Really keen to learn how to Prone surf now, but haven't got a surfing background. Reading the forums looks like I'm better off trying to Prone a 60L wing board than trying to prone my 4'5" board.

For now I'm sticking to SUP foiling. My board is fairly large but I'm able to catch waves, and have fun learning to surf.

Winging a prone board:
From my POV it's not so hard to wing a 38L sinker board but you need to be experienced, flexible in your hips (I used to slackline a lot) and you need to have steady strong wind. I also underestimated how much you end up drifting down wind if you don't have enough wind to make it, I would say 45 degrees down wind, worst case.

TooMuchEpoxy
167 posts
30 May 2022 5:22PM
Thumbs Up

I'm finding alot of prone baord design to be somewhat swell specific.

For places with faster, longer period, deep water swell the wave is moving so quickly the goal is to get closer to wave speed to catch it before it breaks, thats why alot of shapers have gravitated towards a little bit longer waterline (new skinny amundson boards) and more of a pulled in tail encorporating the step into a displacement hull shape for more paddle power (Freedom Techno 2, rubix, etc.). Most of these designs keep some kind of hard edge on the step with the goal of transitioning froma displacment hull to a clean release planing surface at high speed. Most shapers we know and care about are in places with "good" fast deep water swell so thats what we're seeing most of.

I don't live with these conditions though.

I've found for weaker windswell and a coastal geography that slows this swell further these boards don't work as well. I'm typically catching a wave thats already breaking, crumbing, but weak. I find catching these waves is much more about an already breaking wave wave impacting the baord and initiating low speed planing. For this a wider tailblock and smaller kick increases the area where the wave impacts for more energy transfer at that critical moment. Keeping the width also lowers paning speed to help the board with that fast acceleration in the lower speed range.

I've ridden my wider planing hull board in more powerful, longer period, deep water waves and it was miserable. I didn't have paddle power to catch it early so i was working qick exits in the impact zone. Conversely i tried a skinny, pulled in tail at my home break and i felt like i couldn't catch anything.

mcrt
476 posts
1 Jun 2022 3:08AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
TooMuchEpoxy said..
I'm finding alot of prone baord design to be somewhat swell specific.

For places with faster, longer period, deep water swell the wave is moving so quickly the goal is to get closer to wave speed to catch it before it breaks, thats why alot of shapers have gravitated towards a little bit longer waterline (new skinny amundson boards) and more of a pulled in tail encorporating the step into a displacement hull shape for more paddle power (Freedom Techno 2, rubix, etc.). Most of these designs keep some kind of hard edge on the step with the goal of transitioning froma displacment hull to a clean release planing surface at high speed. Most shapers we know and care about are in places with "good" fast deep water swell so thats what we're seeing most of.

I don't live with these conditions though.

I've found for weaker windswell and a coastal geography that slows this swell further these boards don't work as well. I'm typically catching a wave thats already breaking, crumbing, but weak. I find catching these waves is much more about an already breaking wave wave impacting the baord and initiating low speed planing. For this a wider tailblock and smaller kick increases the area where the wave impacts for more energy transfer at that critical moment. Keeping the width also lowers paning speed to help the board with that fast acceleration in the lower speed range.

I've ridden my wider planing hull board in more powerful, longer period, deep water waves and it was miserable. I didn't have paddle power to catch it early so i was working qick exits in the impact zone. Conversely i tried a skinny, pulled in tail at my home break and i felt like i couldn't catch anything.


Ok
I am thinking about an Appletree Surffoil board:
appletreesurfboards.com/product/pro-foil-surf-v2-allround-surf-foil-board/#stock-or-custom

Where would you put this shape? fast waves?
The 4.9 is 20in wide, 3.5in thick and 39.5 liters.






TooMuchEpoxy
167 posts
1 Jun 2022 6:07AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
mcrt said..

TooMuchEpoxy said..
I'm finding alot of prone baord design to be somewhat swell specific.

For places with faster, longer period, deep water swell the wave is moving so quickly the goal is to get closer to wave speed to catch it before it breaks, thats why alot of shapers have gravitated towards a little bit longer waterline (new skinny amundson boards) and more of a pulled in tail encorporating the step into a displacement hull shape for more paddle power (Freedom Techno 2, rubix, etc.). Most of these designs keep some kind of hard edge on the step with the goal of transitioning froma displacment hull to a clean release planing surface at high speed. Most shapers we know and care about are in places with "good" fast deep water swell so thats what we're seeing most of.

I don't live with these conditions though.

I've found for weaker windswell and a coastal geography that slows this swell further these boards don't work as well. I'm typically catching a wave thats already breaking, crumbing, but weak. I find catching these waves is much more about an already breaking wave wave impacting the baord and initiating low speed planing. For this a wider tailblock and smaller kick increases the area where the wave impacts for more energy transfer at that critical moment. Keeping the width also lowers paning speed to help the board with that fast acceleration in the lower speed range.

I've ridden my wider planing hull board in more powerful, longer period, deep water waves and it was miserable. I didn't have paddle power to catch it early so i was working qick exits in the impact zone. Conversely i tried a skinny, pulled in tail at my home break and i felt like i couldn't catch anything.



Ok
I am thinking about an Appletree Surffoil board:
appletreesurfboards.com/product/pro-foil-surf-v2-allround-surf-foil-board/#stock-or-custom

Where would you put this shape? fast waves?
The 4.9 is 20in wide, 3.5in thick and 39.5 liters.







Super Interesting Shape!!! Definately fast waves! I'd call this more of a pulled in, dispacement hull, fast paddler. It certainly looks boaty!

Tail is super pulled in(althogh its really gradual), really small flat planing section around the boxes, tail step is really blended (no sharp edges).

It gives the illusion of being more of a planing shape because that flat surface gets wider as it goes back but that flat surface is maybe 10 in at the widest and those chamfered rails are too agressive of an angle to contribute to planing in any meaningful way.

juandesooka
579 posts
1 Jun 2022 7:36AM
Thumbs Up

My main prone board is a DIY homage to that appletree board, as I found the nose/bottom shape intriguing. The online feedback was that the extreme nose vee had a tendency for the board to skate side to side, so I added bevels to limit that.

It generally works fine, but I think the nose has a tendency to dig in more than it would if flat or concave. I picture it like a deep vee boat hull, designed to cut into the waves, versus slap and bounce. Bouncing is annoying for boats but is actually a good design feature for foilboards. I notice this on white water take-offs, as the nose will plow, I get a face full of spray, which can sometimes mess up my pop up. I wouldn't build that particular nose again for a prone board.

I built same bottom profile on my sup foil, I like it there. Though I am also a somewhat cynical board builder in that I honestly think most of these design features make little difference, at least to my semi-advanced intermediate middle-age riding capability. Keep it simple seems best.

mcrt
476 posts
1 Jun 2022 1:23PM
Thumbs Up

They also make this other surf shape which looks more standard/planing hull maybe:
appletreesurfboards.com/product/appleslice-surf-foil-board/#stock-or-custom

I am keen on Appleslice because they use closed cell foam, i have to surf with a carbon&metal kneebrace and as much as i pad it i end up with tiny,unnoticed dings that suck water on standard EPS.

I am sure that both shapes would work for my very limited abilities, i will ask the shaper what he thinks is best at the spots around here.






TooMuchEpoxy
167 posts
1 Jun 2022 5:44PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
TooMuchEpoxy said..

mcrt said..


TooMuchEpoxy said..
I'm finding alot of prone baord design to be somewhat swell specific.

For places with faster, longer period, deep water swell the wave is moving so quickly the goal is to get closer to wave speed to catch it before it breaks, thats why alot of shapers have gravitated towards a little bit longer waterline (new skinny amundson boards) and more of a pulled in tail encorporating the step into a displacement hull shape for more paddle power (Freedom Techno 2, rubix, etc.). Most of these designs keep some kind of hard edge on the step with the goal of transitioning froma displacment hull to a clean release planing surface at high speed. Most shapers we know and care about are in places with "good" fast deep water swell so thats what we're seeing most of.

I don't live with these conditions though.

I've found for weaker windswell and a coastal geography that slows this swell further these boards don't work as well. I'm typically catching a wave thats already breaking, crumbing, but weak. I find catching these waves is much more about an already breaking wave wave impacting the baord and initiating low speed planing. For this a wider tailblock and smaller kick increases the area where the wave impacts for more energy transfer at that critical moment. Keeping the width also lowers paning speed to help the board with that fast acceleration in the lower speed range.

I've ridden my wider planing hull board in more powerful, longer period, deep water waves and it was miserable. I didn't have paddle power to catch it early so i was working qick exits in the impact zone. Conversely i tried a skinny, pulled in tail at my home break and i felt like i couldn't catch anything.




Ok
I am thinking about an Appletree Surffoil board:
appletreesurfboards.com/product/pro-foil-surf-v2-allround-surf-foil-board/#stock-or-custom

Where would you put this shape? fast waves?
The 4.9 is 20in wide, 3.5in thick and 39.5 liters.







Super Interesting Shape!!! Definately fast waves! I'd call this more of a pulled in, dispacement hull, fast paddler. It certainly looks boaty!

Tail is super pulled in(althogh its really gradual), really small flat planing section around the boxes, tail step is really blended (no sharp edges).

It gives the illusion of being more of a planing shape because that flat surface gets wider as it goes back but that flat surface is maybe 10 in at the widest and those chamfered rails are too agressive of an angle to contribute to planing in any meaningful way.



Select to expand quote
TooMuchEpoxy said..

mcrt said..


TooMuchEpoxy said..
I'm finding alot of prone baord design to be somewhat swell specific.

For places with faster, longer period, deep water swell the wave is moving so quickly the goal is to get closer to wave speed to catch it before it breaks, thats why alot of shapers have gravitated towards a little bit longer waterline (new skinny amundson boards) and more of a pulled in tail encorporating the step into a displacement hull shape for more paddle power (Freedom Techno 2, rubix, etc.). Most of these designs keep some kind of hard edge on the step with the goal of transitioning froma displacment hull to a clean release planing surface at high speed. Most shapers we know and care about are in places with "good" fast deep water swell so thats what we're seeing most of.

I don't live with these conditions though.

I've found for weaker windswell and a coastal geography that slows this swell further these boards don't work as well. I'm typically catching a wave thats already breaking, crumbing, but weak. I find catching these waves is much more about an already breaking wave wave impacting the baord and initiating low speed planing. For this a wider tailblock and smaller kick increases the area where the wave impacts for more energy transfer at that critical moment. Keeping the width also lowers paning speed to help the board with that fast acceleration in the lower speed range.

I've ridden my wider planing hull board in more powerful, longer period, deep water waves and it was miserable. I didn't have paddle power to catch it early so i was working qick exits in the impact zone. Conversely i tried a skinny, pulled in tail at my home break and i felt like i couldn't catch anything.




Ok
I am thinking about an Appletree Surffoil board:
appletreesurfboards.com/product/pro-foil-surf-v2-allround-surf-foil-board/#stock-or-custom

Where would you put this shape? fast waves?
The 4.9 is 20in wide, 3.5in thick and 39.5 liters.







Super Interesting Shape!!! Definately fast waves! I'd call this more of a pulled in, dispacement hull, fast paddler. It certainly looks boaty!

Tail is super pulled in(althogh its really gradual), really small flat planing section around the boxes, tail step is really blended (no sharp edges).

It gives the illusion of being more of a planing shape because that flat surface gets wider as it goes back but that flat surface is maybe 10 in at the widest and those chamfered rails are too agressive of an angle to contribute to planing in any meaningful way.




Select to expand quote
TooMuchEpoxy said..

mcrt said..


TooMuchEpoxy said..
I'm finding alot of prone baord design to be somewhat swell specific.

For places with faster, longer period, deep water swell the wave is moving so quickly the goal is to get closer to wave speed to catch it before it breaks, thats why alot of shapers have gravitated towards a little bit longer waterline (new skinny amundson boards) and more of a pulled in tail encorporating the step into a displacement hull shape for more paddle power (Freedom Techno 2, rubix, etc.). Most of these designs keep some kind of hard edge on the step with the goal of transitioning froma displacment hull to a clean release planing surface at high speed. Most shapers we know and care about are in places with "good" fast deep water swell so thats what we're seeing most of.

I don't live with these conditions though.

I've found for weaker windswell and a coastal geography that slows this swell further these boards don't work as well. I'm typically catching a wave thats already breaking, crumbing, but weak. I find catching these waves is much more about an already breaking wave wave impacting the baord and initiating low speed planing. For this a wider tailblock and smaller kick increases the area where the wave impacts for more energy transfer at that critical moment. Keeping the width also lowers paning speed to help the board with that fast acceleration in the lower speed range.

I've ridden my wider planing hull board in more powerful, longer period, deep water waves and it was miserable. I didn't have paddle power to catch it early so i was working qick exits in the impact zone. Conversely i tried a skinny, pulled in tail at my home break and i felt like i couldn't catch anything.




Ok
I am thinking about an Appletree Surffoil board:
appletreesurfboards.com/product/pro-foil-surf-v2-allround-surf-foil-board/#stock-or-custom

Where would you put this shape? fast waves?
The 4.9 is 20in wide, 3.5in thick and 39.5 liters.







Super Interesting Shape!!! Definately fast waves! I'd call this more of a pulled in, dispacement hull, fast paddler. It certainly looks boaty!

Tail is super pulled in(althogh its really gradual), really small flat planing section around the boxes, tail step is really blended (no sharp edges).

It gives the illusion of being more of a planing shape because that flat surface gets wider as it goes back but that flat surface is maybe 10 in at the widest and those chamfered rails are too agressive of an angle to contribute to planing in any meaningful way.

I believe in simplicity in shape, and extremes in construction(stiffness is everything) My board is full planing hull. 2x carbon over a full PVC foam blank plus extra box reinforcement.

I went to this monster construction after killing a production board in 3 sessions. In terms of construction appletree is the only board I'd even consider (although I'd love to know what the foam is and more specifics on reinforcement)

for design, as I said I'm committed to planing hull shapes, the Ginxu looks like the first piece of innovation in that area in a while. Looks amazing from a design standpoint. Construction tho that's a nightmare, there's no way they're building it stiff enough(for my tastes). My last 2" board got 2x carbon, internal carbon stringers, full HD foam and still needed 12oz uni added to the deck to get if stiff enough for me.

Hwy1North
50 posts
2 Jun 2022 6:38AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
juandesooka said..
My main prone board is a DIY homage to that appletree board, as I found the nose/bottom shape intriguing. The online feedback was that the extreme nose vee had a tendency for the board to skate side to side, so I added bevels to limit that.

It generally works fine, but I think the nose has a tendency to dig in more than it would if flat or concave. I picture it like a deep vee boat hull, designed to cut into the waves, versus slap and bounce. Bouncing is annoying for boats but is actually a good design feature for foilboards. I notice this on white water take-offs, as the nose will plow, I get a face full of spray, which can sometimes mess up my pop up. I wouldn't build that particular nose again for a prone board.

I built same bottom profile on my sup foil, I like it there. Though I am also a somewhat cynical board builder in that I honestly think most of these design features make little difference, at least to my semi-advanced intermediate middle-age riding capability. Keep it simple seems best.


I think I replied to you on another forum about this. I have one and found the positives to be solely the extra quick release from water lifting off. So if I were surfing short period swell with little power, I might have liked it. As I surf long period Pacific Ocean waves, the totally flat rocker and extreme v made for little control on steep take offs as the board wants to bounce up, and white water rides are akin to a bucking bronco. I modified the board by taking out much of the v and adding nose rocker. Helped a bit, but still too flat off the tail for me. Construction is best in the biz. Just need a shape suited to me. MCRT, are you in the Bay Area? You can have my frankenboard... pm me.

timmcg89
WA, 13 posts
23 Jun 2022 6:08PM
Thumbs Up

Amos Spitfire with the boxes set forward .
can anyone give me intel on whether it's exclusively for HA wings? Wondering if it will still be compatible with my axis 890 BSC or 830 HPS which are sitting in the middle of my sunova boxes.

Hdip
280 posts
24 Jun 2022 1:03AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
timmcg89 said..
Amos Spitfire with the boxes set forward .


It should be fine. You'd have two options if it isn't to your liking with the mast all the way in the back of the boxes. 1. Shim the tail for less lift. This will also give you a higher top speed theoretically. 2. Get the new advanced fuse which will allow you to have the mast +40 mm from where you'd normally place your AXIS mast. So it would likely work in those boxes and be better for wave riding anyway.

timmcg89
WA, 13 posts
24 Jun 2022 6:02AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Hdip said..


timmcg89 said..
Amos Spitfire with the boxes set forward .




It should be fine. You'd have two options if it isn't to your liking with the mast all the way in the back of the boxes. 1. Shim the tail for less lift. This will also give you a higher top speed theoretically. 2. Get the new advanced fuse which will allow you to have the mast +40 mm from where you'd normally place your AXIS mast. So it would likely work in those boxes and be better for wave riding anyway.



Thanks! Love this forum

cefirmeza
5 posts
24 Jun 2022 9:22PM
Thumbs Up







Any thoughts on this long and super narrow design for prone? would it be possible to balance as a SUP dw for light riders?

Hdip
280 posts
25 Jun 2022 1:12AM
Thumbs Up

If you have serious skills and very good balance, yes.

www.instagram.com/p/CcSYv9KjdLk/

cefirmeza
5 posts
25 Jun 2022 6:29AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Hdip said..
If you have serious skills and very good balance, yes.

www.instagram.com/p/CcSYv9KjdLk/


Been reading this forum section and following riders and shapers on intagram. Some last board designs are keeping the wider tail on top of the deck to improve balance but on the bottom the same kalama style pin tail. Maybe this design can reduce thickness for same total volume but extra length. some people may prefer shorter boards with less swing weight but thicker.
I am still trying to understand the pros and cons for what works best but as you said, it all comes down to personal skill level. No sup foil downwinders where I live so i am working with a local shaper on my first sup dw.
As a skilled wing foiler I'm used to ride narrow (34L 4'11 x 19") @ 62kg will start with a 6'0 x 20" 80L pintail shape. After 20+ hours practice of balance and paddling on a 80L 25" wingboard can power stroke comfortably on flat and choppy windy conditions but haven't been able to pop up yet because the shape drag.
Cant wait to try it on a proper board when its done.



Subscribe
Reply

Forums > Stand Up Paddle Foiling


"Latest in Prone Board design?" started by eppo